Why Sing Hymns? Insights From Some Early Church Fathers

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A subject that fascinates me is Christian hymns. In this post, I’ll start at the very beginning: why sing hymns at all? In today’s churches they have largely been supplanted by choruses, after all. Yet there has been a heavy price to pay.

In the introduction to his Exposition of the Psalms of David, the medieval theologian Thomas Aquinas wrote this about hymn singing: A hymn is the praise of God with song; a song is the exultation of the mind dwelling on eternal things, bursting forth in the voice.

It would seem that, for the first Christian centuries, believers sang their hymns without stopping to analyse the process. One of the first who did was John Chrysostom (347-407). In his ‘Exposition on Psalm 41’, he points out that music is an integral part of the human condition: To such an extent, indeed, is our nature delighted by chants and songs that even infants at the breast, if they be weeping or afflicted, are by reason of it lulled to sleep.

Mixing this innate sense of music with the power of words is, Chrysostom continues, a powerful vehicle, affecting the intellect and spiritual standing of the singer.

When God saw that the majority of men were slothful and that they approached spiritual reading with reluctance and submitted to the effort involved without pleasure – wishing to make the task more agreeable and to relieve the sense of laboriousness – He mixed melody with prophecy, so that, enticed by the rhythm and melody, all might raise sacred hymns to Him with great eagerness. For nothing so arouses the soul, gives it wings, sets it free from earth, releases it from the prison of the body, teaches it to love wisdom, and to condemn all the things of this life, as concordant melody and sacred song composed in rhythm.

In words very relevant to today’s i-pod culture, Chrysostom warns that there are bad words and bad music too, and these can similarly affect the human soul. “Those things that are lascivious and vicious in all songs settle in parts of the mind, making it softer and weaker.” That is why, he maintains, the devil is keen to fill the mind with dirty things through music.

From the spiritual hymns, however, proceeds much of value, much utility and sanctity, for the words purify the mind and the Holy Spirit descends swiftly upon the mind of the singer. For those who sing with understanding invoke the grace of the Spirit.

 

d490b-notescolor1Another early Church father who understood the ‘why’ of hymn-singing was Basil of Caesarea (†379). In his Discourse on Psalm 1, he writes:

The Spirit mixed sweetness of melody with doctrine so that inadvertently we would absorb the benefit of the words through gentleness and ease of hearing. O the wise invention of the teacher who contrives that in our singing we learn what is profitable, and that thereby doctrine is somehow more deeply impressed upon our souls.

The first Christians understood the need to confess spiritual truth aloud: not just to ‘believe in your heart’, but also to ‘confess with your lips’ [Romans 10:9]. Or in Basil’s words, to impress doctrine more deeply on their souls. For this they had a clear and obvious model: the Jews. At first, Christianity was a Jewish sect. The early Christians continued to worship at the Temple and to attend synagogues. It was therefore inevitable that Jewish methods of performing music were incorporated into Christian worship.

In particular, the church continued to use the book of Psalms. Basil again:

Now the prophets teach certain things, the historians and the Law teach other, and Proverbs provides still a different sort of advice, but the Book of Psalms encompasses the benefit of them all. It foretells what is to come and memorialises history; it legislates for life, gives advice on practical matters, and serves in general as a repository of good teachings.

In other words, if it is important to confess God’s truth aloud, then how better than to sing scripture. Not only is there no risk of emotionalism or error, but also the addition of music aids the memorising of the words.

In the next post, I’ll be looking more at the Jewish roots of Christian spiritual song and choral worship.

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About Trevor Saxby

I'm a mentor, friend to many, with a PhD in church history. I love learning from the 'movers and shakers' of the past, as I want to be one today!

6 responses to “Why Sing Hymns? Insights From Some Early Church Fathers”

  1. St Chrysostoms says :

    Lovely quotations from Chrysostom, thank you.
    It would be lovely to know what the music / singing which Chrysostom heard in the fourth century sounded like.

  2. Trevor Saxby says :

    We would probably be looking at a mid-point between this: http://www.smithcreekmusic.com/Hymnology/Sound.Files/Psalm8.mp3 (traditional Jewish synagogue chant) and this: http://www.smithcreekmusic.com/Hymnology/Sound.Files/PaterNoster1.mp3 (7th century Christian, one of the earliest we have actual notation for). Thank you for your comment.

  3. John Vagabond says :

    It’s fascinating to speculate what the ancient songs, particularly in Hebrew or Aramaic might have sounded like. Quite apart from the Psalms, there’s plenty of evidence for the existence of the ‘song of worship’, from the Torahic hymns of the Exodus, Hannah’s Song, the Hymns of Isaiah, Jonah, Habbakuk the apocryphal addendum, Song of the Three Children in Daniel, etc.
    I like to think that the ancient thread of Hebrew music is still in evidence and although secular, I wonder if this might have been the kind of sound…

  4. John Vagabond says :

    You got me thinking. This might be of interest – but perhaps you yourself used it as a source.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33160/33160-h/33160-h.htm

  5. Trevor Saxby says :

    Thanks for that link, John. Very different from Hillsong, etc.! I think you could be right that this is the traditional Bible lands style – though the cantors would probably have been mainly male.

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