The In-Breaking Kingdom Of God: Johann Blumhardt and the ‘Natural Supernatural’


The Plough, published by Church Communities International, has announced a bold and very welcome move: to publish, for the first time in English, the works of two remarkable men: Johann Christoph Blumhardt (1805-1880) and his son, Christoph Friedrich Blumhardt (1842-1919).

“What do such wildly diverse movements as religious socialism, neo-orthodoxy, Pentecostalism, and such Christian thinkers like Karl Barth, Eberhard Arnold, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Jacques Ellul and Jürgen Moltmann, have in common?”, writes one of the series’ editors. “They all trace their Christian understanding of the world and God’s kingdom to Johann Christoph Blumhardt, a humble pastor in Germany who lived in the 19th century.”

Johann Christoph was pastor in Möttlingen, a village in South-West Germany as unremarkable as Blumhardt himself. Until 1842, that is, when circumstances plunged him into the realm of ‘deliverance ministry’, exorcism and healing prayer. A young woman exhibiting the classic symptoms of demonisation, as shown in the Gospels, was released after an intensive season of prayer, spiritual battle and exorcism.

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Möttlingen was swept up in an unprecedented movement of repentance and renewal. Stolen property was returned, broken marriages restored, enemies reconciled, alcoholics freed, and more amazingly still, an entire village experienced what life could be like when God ruled.” People started arriving from miles around, drawn by the manifest power of God and the possible hope of freedom in their own lives. Such ‘success’ was, in fact, embarrassing for Blumhardt, who was a solid and unflamboyant character and freely admitted that he was no expert in these matters.

Even so, “Blumhardt’s parsonage eventually could not accommodate the numbers of people streaming to it. He thus began to look for a place with more room and greater freedom. He moved his family to Bad Boll, a complex of large buildings which had been developed as a spa around a sulfur water spring. His biographer [in German] recounts in vivid detail one story after another of how through the small circle at Bad Boll, desperate individuals of all stripes— burdened with mental, emotional, physical and spiritual maladies—found healing and renewed faith.”

Blumhardt had the courage to work through the ideological issues (and plenty of opposition) and to conclude emphatically that the Kingdom of God was perennially able to break into everyday life, with whatever manifestation of the divine or miraculous that the Holy Spirit might choose.

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Blumhardt was not a theologian and did not attempt a reasoned theology of his stance. He was a practical man, full of compassion, who was wise enough to realise that the damaged, the sick and the demonised need compassion and hope in their damaged souls every bit as much as healing or exorcism. His sermons pleaded, cared, pointed to a God who is love and who wants us to know it.

But Blumhardt also offers hope to Christians who long for the transcendental, for God’s power to be seen in today’s world. He was convinced that the Old Testament prophecy of Joel, quoted by Peter when the Holy Spirit was first outpoured (Acts 2:17) had only been partly fulfilled; that the generous and saving God in whom he believed had so much more for the Church to discover and to use for God’s glory and the blessing of multitudes.

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About Trevor Saxby

I'm a mentor, friend to many, with a PhD in church history. I love learning from the 'movers and shakers' of the past, as I want to be one today!

4 responses to “The In-Breaking Kingdom Of God: Johann Blumhardt and the ‘Natural Supernatural’”

  1. normal says :

    Just shows how seemingly obscure happenings (and people) can end up having a big impact way beyond what anyone would have likely predicted at the time.

  2. Trevor Saxby says :

    Absolutely! I have grown to understand why the apparently superfluous phrase crops up in the Book of Acts: “He opened his mouth and…” There could be no telling what might happen if the Holy Spirit was released from a Spirit-filled and risk-taking vessel.

  3. sattler says :

    Thanks Trevor. I'm glad to see the Blumhardt's in English. Church Communities' commitment to their work does all a service. Whenever I'm inclined to drive a wedge between church and Kingdom those Blumhardts pop up to redress the balance.

  4. Trevor Saxby says :

    Good to hear! Thank you. The balance is so necessary, given that there are now websites actively proclaiming something akin to the 17th century concept of the “transfert” – that God has left the churches of the West entirely and gone to work in developing countries. Blumhardt insists that the number of true, Spirit-filled disciples may indded be few, but he doesn't divorce them from the churches, to whom they are to be light and a vehicle of kingdom breakthrough.

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